Future Imperfect

SIERRA NEVADA

In California’s fourth climate change assessment, the Sierra Nevada region is huge, extending along the eastern edge of the state from the Oregon border all the way down to Death Valley in the southeast. It includes 14 entire counties, plus the eastern parts of 4 others. The discovery of gold here in the mid-1800s led to many thousands of people pouring into the area, but today only 3% of it is cities or agricultural areas. The remaining 97% is grasslands, shrublands, forests, and, in the south, high desert. Four young people spoke with me and helped me understand how climate change is likely to affect day-to-day life in this region.

Questions

  1. In what ways is climate change expected to affect the Sierra Nevada region? Which of these effects will have the greatest impact on people’s day-to-day lives, in your opinion?

  2. How are current fire- and water-related problems in the Sierra Nevada region related to climate change? How are they related to human decisions and government policies in California?

  3. This episode discusses wildfire, soil dryness, and tree mortality. Take a look at the maps showing fire incidents, soil moisture levels, and tree mortality across the state. How does your hometown compare to the towns you heard about in this episode? (They are: Penn Valley, Nevada City, Big Pine, Bishop)

  4. Have you had any weather- or environment-related experiences similar to the young people in this episode? If so, how are your experiences similar? If not, why do you think that is?

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Antonino (Penn Valley), Evelyn (Nevada City), Brooke (Big Pine), and Joseph (Bishop).

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

About anticipated climate change impacts:

About the Camp Fire (aka the Paradise Fire):

About nuclear energy:

About wildfire:

About the genocide against Native Californians:

About water in the Owens Valley:

Relevant Maps:

Future Imperfect

Government, Part 2

This is the second of two episodes about local government. The last episode explored the basics of how local government works – the kinds of things California cities and counties are responsible for and who does what within a city government. In this you’ll learn how and when you can most effectively interact with your local government.

Questions and Activities

  1. Which government(s) have jurisdiction over the place where you live? Use randymajors.org to confirm your city (if you’re in one) and your county.
    Note: You may live in an unincorporated area that falls outside of any city, but comes under the jurisdiction of a county. Or, you might live on reservation lands, in which case the tribal government is your local government.

  2. Find your local government’s website and
    (a) locate the meeting schedule for the council/board of supervisors,
    (b) find the agenda for the most recent city council meeting or (if you don’t live in a city) county board of supervisors meeting, and
    (c) see if your city/county makes video of past meetings available.
    Note: If you live on reservation lands, your local government may not make meeting agendas publicly available on their website because, as sovereign governments, they are not subject to California’s meeting laws.

  3. Using this Caltrans map of planning agencies, identify the planning agency that manages transportation planning where you live, then take a look at their website to see if you can find agendas for their meetings. See “Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) & Regional Transportation Planning Agency (RTPA) Links” to find your local agency.
    Note: If you live in a place that has both a regional transportation planning agency and also a county or metropolitan agency, find meeting information for the smaller one. For example, if you live in Los Angeles County, look up agendas for the Los Angeles County MTA, not Southern California Association of Governments.

  4. Check this list of CA Youth Commissions and Councils to see if your local government already has a youth commission/council.
    Note: You should also search your local government website, in case this list is not up to date.

  5. Use the CalEnviroScreen Map to look at your hometown. Are there any census tracts in your hometown with an overall CalEnviroScreen overall percentile of 75 - 100? What does this mean for your city or county, the next time they update their general plan?

Voices

In order of appearance, the people I interviewed for this episode were: Karen Pinkas (El Cerrito), Dana Murray (Manhattan Beach), Juan (Sacramento), Sky Woodruff (Bay Area city attorney), Donna Colson (Burlingame), Rob Ball (Kern County), Tiffany Wise-West (Santa Cruz), Moiz (Sacramento), Carissa Bradley (Sierra Business Council), and Frank Lyles (Mount Shasta).

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

Below, you’ll find resources related to the topics mentioned in this episode. See the Resources list from the last episode for more information about local government.

Tools to find local government agencies:

About community engagement:

About SB 1000:

About the Sacramento Mayors’ Commission on Climate Change:

About the CivicSpark Fellowships:

About state-level climate change policy in California:

Future Imperfect

Government, Part 1

This is the first of two episodes about local government. We begin with the basic structure of local government so you can understand who does what. Plus, we look at what local governments are doing to address climate change. In the next episode, you’ll learn how you can get involved and influence these policies.

Questions

  1. What is a climate action plan? What is a climate adaptation plan? How can these documents influence policy-making in local government?

  2. Does your city, county, or school district have a climate action plan, an energy action plan, or a climate adaptation plan? First, look at the CAP-Map. If you don’t see anything there, search their websites.

  3. Is your city a charter city or a general law city? If it’s a charter city, who is responsible for preparing the budget?

  4. What is one way local governments reduce greenhouse gas emissions?

  5. How are local government agencies working to adapt, so that climate change will be less dangerous for their residents?

  6. What questions would you like to ask your local government officials after listening to this episode?

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Zeke (Canyon Arroyo), Sky Woodruff (Bay Area city attorney), Bo Pak (Oakland), Donna Colson (Burlingame), Karen Pinkas (El Cerrito), Lana Adlawan (North Bay), Bjorn Jones (Grass Valley), Tiffany Wise-West (Santa Cruz), and Dana Murray (Manhattan Beach).

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

There is a tremendous amount of information about government planning for climate change. Below, you’ll find resources related to all the topics mentioned in the show.

Interactive tools:

California Climate Action Portal (CAP-Map) from Air Resources Board

Our Coast, Our Future - Hazard Map

EN-ROADS Climate Change Solutions Simulator
This simulator allows you to play with possible government policies at a national level to see how different policies would affect global temperatures.

City websites and documents related to this episode:

“Types and Responsibilities of Local Agencies” from Institute for Local Government

Alameda County Stop Waste

City of Burlingame Climate Action Plan

City of Burlingame Disposable Food Service Ware ordinance

City of El Cerrito Climate Action Plan

PG&E Public Safety Power Shutoff October 9th-12th Report from PG&E

City of Grass Valley

One Shoreline: San Mateo County Flood and Sea Level Resiliency District (FSLR)

City of Santa Cruz Climate Action Planning

City of Santa Cruz Climate Adaptation Planning

City of Santa Cruz Beaches: Urban Climate Adaptation Policy Implication & Response Strategy Evaluation Technical Report

Sustainable Manhattan Beach

About laws and policies from State of California:

“AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006” from California Air Resources Board

AB 32 Climate Change Scoping Plan” from California Air Resources Board

“California Cap and Trade” from Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

“Cap and Trade Explained in Two and a Half Minutes” from Cal Matters

Checking the math on cap and trade, some experts say it’s not adding up” from Cal Matters

SB 100: California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program: emissions of greenhouse gases

About mitigation and adaptation planning:

“Preparing for Climate Change in California” from Georgetown Climate Center (an overview of steps the state has taken to prepare for climate change impacts)

“California Climate Policy Dashboard” from Berkeley Law

“Climate Action Plans” from Institute for Local Government

“Local Government” from CoolCalifornia.org (Climate Action Planning)

Climate Tools from Cal-Adapt

“2019 Report on the State of Climate Action Plans in California" from California Air Resources Board

“Adaptation Capability Advancement Toolkit (Adapt-CA)” from Adapt-CA

Adaptation Planning Guide from Resilient CA

California Adaptation Planning Guide: Defining Local & Regional Impacts from California Emergency Management Agency

California Adaptation Planning Guide: Understanding Regional Characteristics from California Emergency Management Agency

Planning and Investing for a Resilient California: a guidebook for state agencies from Governor’s Office of Planning and Research

“Transformative Climate Communities: Community-led transformation for a sustainable California” from California Strategic Growth Council

About community choice aggregation:

“Lessons from East Bay Community Energy for Central Valley cities pursuing Community Choice Energy” from Environmental Justice Project

“Answers to ‘Where Does MCE’s Energy Come From?’” from MCE

“Power to the People: Community Choice Aggregation in California” from Georgetown Environmental Law Review

About complete streets:

“National Complete Streets Coalition” from Smart Growth America

“Complete Streets Program” from CalTrans

About microgrids:

“Community Microgrid Initiative” from Clean Coalition

About preventing flooding:

“Bioswales” from National Association of City Transportation Officials

“How Does Permeable Pavement Work?” from Practical Engineering

“Urban wetland at Peabody Creek” (in Grass Valley) from The Union

“Grass Valley looks ahead with groundwater recharge projects” from The Union

About addressing sea-level rise:

“Climate change could result in a beachless Manhattan Beach” from Easy Reader & Peninsula

California Has A New Idea For Homes At Risk From Rising Seas: Buy, Rent, Retreat” from NPR

Coastal Armoring in California

“Can reviving beach dunes help California with sea level rise?” from Los Angeles Times

About cool streets & shade trees:

Global Cool Cities Alliance

“Shade” from 99% Invisible

‘Turn Off the Sunshine’: Why Shade Is a Mark of Privilege in Los Angeles” from New York Times

Student-Led Mapping Locates Areas in Los Angeles in Need of Shade Equity” from ESRI Blog

City Plants

USC Urban Trees Initiative

Future Imperfect

San Joaquin Valley, Part 2

In the last episode, you learned how climate change is projected to affect air quality and heat in the San Joaquin Valley region. Another big projected change has to do with water. This episode is part two for the San Joaquin Valley region. It’s all about how changing precipitation patterns will affect life in the Central Valley.

Questions

  1. Use the Drinking Water Tool and the Current U.S. Drought Monitor to figure out where your water comes from and to see how your part of the state is doing in terms of drought. How does this compare to drought conditions in Bakersfield, Delano, Coalinga, and Huron?

  2. How did the past drought (2011 - 2017) affect the people you heard from in this episode? Compare this to how it affected your life.

  3. After listening, watch this Groundwater Aquifer Contamination video. How is drought related to water contamination by 123 TCP and other chemicals?

  4. How might each of the following water-related actions affect life in the San Joaquin Valley region? Also, how do you think they would affect life in other parts of the state?

    • taking more/less water out of rivers and streams

    • managing dams differently

    • fallowing land and using it for solar farms instead

    • allowing snowmelt to flood certain areas at specific times of year so it can sink down into groundwater aquifers

Voices

The young people in this episode were first introduced in San Joaquin Valley, Part 1. In order of appearance, they were: Luke (Coalinga), Ivan (Earlimart), Michael (Huron), Yvette (Bakersfield), Karissa (Delano), and Elizabeth (Delano). I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

Your Water

“Drinking Water Tool” from Community Water Center

“Draining California” from National Geographic

“Current U.S. Drought Monitor Conditions for California” at NOAA and NIDIS

“Central Valley Project” from Water Education Foundation

Save Our Water

2011 - 2017 Drought

“California Drought: 2011-2017 - A story about the historic drought” from NOAA and NIDIS

“A guide to California's water crisis — and why it's so hard to fix” from Vox

Conflict over Water Use

“Agriculture is 80 percent of water use in California. Why aren’t farmers being forced to cut back?” from Washington Post (2015)

“Delta smelt: the tiny fish caught in California's war with Trump” from The Guardian

“California Drought sharpens perpetual water conflict” (2021) from Cal Matters

Water Shortages

“Deep Deficit” from Science

“An entire California town is without running water — in a heat wave” (2021) from Cal Matters

“In California’s agricultural heartland, thousands of wells could soon run dry” (2021) from PBS News Hour

“Tulare County’s never-ending drought brings dried up wells and plenty of misery” (2021) from Cal Matters

Groundwater Issues

Groundwater Availability and Sustainable Groundwater Management Act

“New protections for California's aquifers are reshaping the state's Central Valley” from NPR

“Without Enough Water To Go Around, Farmers In California Are Exhausting Aquifers” from NPR

Water Contamination

“City of Delano water system fails to meet drinking standard” from ABC News Bakersfield

“Groundwater Aquifer Contamination” from Community Water Center

“New State Law To Bring Arsenic-Free Drinking Water To Tulare County Community” from KVPR/NPR for Central California

Subsidence

“NASA Data Show California's San Joaquin Valley Still Sinking” from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Dams

“Operating Dams to Better Manage Big Storms Can Build Resiliency to Climate Extremes” from Public Policy Institute of California

“Sedimentation in California Reservoirs: A Long-Term Problem of Immediate Concern” from California Water Law Journal

Flooding

“Coalinga Rain Floods Town with Oil Scum” in the San Francisco Call, 1913

“Coalinga Flooding 06/02/19” via ABC30 Action News

“Flooding in Southwest Bakersfield” from 23 ABC News KERO

2021 Drought

“California’s Latest Drought in 4 Charts” from Public Policy Institute of California

Sen. Hurtado Virtual Press Conference: Drought Impacts

“Growing Uncertainty in the Central Valley” from New Yorker

“As drought worsens, California farmers are being paid not to grow crops” from Los Angeles Times

Deep Dive

“Water and the Future of the San Joaquin Valley” from the Public Policy Institute of California


Future Imperfect

San Joaquin Valley, Part 1

In California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, the San Joaquin Valley region includes all of San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Kings, and Tulare counties, plus parts of Madera, Fresno, and Kern counties. It stretches from Stockton in the north to Bakersfield in the south. About 4 million people live in this region. That’s a little over 10% of the state population. Because its agricultural economy is so intimately connected to the physical environment, climate change is going to have unusually profound effects on life in this part of the state. Part 1 focuses on air quality and heat in the Valley. Part 2 will tackle the incredibly complicated topic of precipitation – both drought and flooding.

Questions

  1. What kinds of air quality problems do people in the San Joaquin Valley region experience? What causes each of these problems?

  2. How is climate change expected to affect heat in the Central Valley? What are some ways this will affect people’s day-to-day lives?

  3. How vulnerable are communities in Bakersfield, Delano, Earlimart, Coalinga, and Huron to climate change effects? Using the CalEnviroScreen, compare your own neighborhood to neighborhoods in two of these cities.

  4. Have you had any weather- or environment-related experiences similar to the young people in this episode? If so, how do are your experiences similar? If not, why do you think that is?

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Yvette (Bakersfield), Elizabeth (Delano), Karissa (Delano), Ivan (Earlimart), Luke (Coalinga), and Michael (Huron). I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

About anticipated climate change impacts:

About the San Joaquin Valley economy:

About air quality:

About heat:

Future Imperfect

Inland Deserts

Inland Deserts includes all of Imperial County, plus desert areas of Riverside and San Bernardino counties the lands of 12 different tribal nations. How will its borderland location, desert environment, and water supply interact with climate change to affect the lives of people in this area? You’ll hear from two young people whose personal experiences will help you glimpse the future in this region.

Questions

  1. In what ways is climate change expected to affect the Inland Deserts region? Which of these effects will have the greatest impact on people’s day-to-day lives, in your opinion?

  2. What is the historical relationship between climate changes and migration? Why is migration (as a form of climate adaptation) more complicated now than in the past?

  3. Look at the resources below about heat, the human body, and workers. What do you think about California’s current regulations to protect farmworkers? How do you think climate change is going to affect the lives of agricultural workers in the Inland Deserts region?

  4. Do you think lithium mining in the Salton Sea is a positive development? Consider it from a perspective of existing air quality problems, the local economy, climate mitigation, and climate justice.

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Angela (El Centro) and Elias (Calexico). I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

About anticipated climate change impacts:

About the Cahuilla and Cocopah peoples:

About the border at Calexico and climate migration:

About heat and the human body:

About heat and work:

About water:

About the Salton Sea:

See photos of Elias’ favorite place, the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park:

Extreme heat will be a problem across much of the US. The video below comes from Wisconsin, far to the north and east of Inland Deserts, but also facing the impacts of high heat.

Future Imperfect

Taking Action

How do young people determine that climate change is a problem that affects them, personally? What kinds of actions do they take, both individually and in community with others? And how do they describe the future they hope for? This episode explores how people make the transition from being concerned about climate change to taking action. You’ll hear from young people across the state, each of whom is taking some kind of action to fight climate change.

Questions

  • What motivated young people to attend the Sacramento climate strike in September 2019? Consider both their concerns about climate change and their hopes for the future. Which person do you most identify with, and why?

  • Did this episode change your thoughts and feelings about how your individual behaviors affect climate change? Why or why not?

  • In the final 20 minutes of the show, you heard from several people who were working to make local institutional changes as part of the larger global fight against climate change. Do you think you’d be willing and able to do what each of these four young people did? Why or why not?

    • Diego (who spoke at a school district meeting and other climate events)

    • Mikayla (who worked with her school’s environmental club)

    • Karissa (who founded an environmental club)

    • Isha (who co-founded a climate justice organization)

  • Isha describes herself as a climate justice activist. What does this mean? Do you think any other people in the show are climate justice activists? Why or why not?

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Supriya, Matthew, Elaro, Marika, Erika, Nick, Denisha, Youlin, Jonathan, Natasha, Sera, Celina, Quintajia, Annika, Aditi, and Kyle (all at the Sacramento protest). Next you hear from Hriday (Livermore), Maddie (Fountain View), Nadine (San Rafael), Amber (San Diego), Zoriana (San Francisco), Domingo (Watsonville), Vince (Santa Cruz), Brooke (Big Pine), Diego (Chula Vista), Mikayla (Windsor), Karissa (Delano), and Isha (Oakland). I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

About the urgency of the problem:

About the Juliana v. US court case:

About individual behavioral changes and the scale of the problem:

Climate activism organizations (referenced in the show):

Climate activism organizations I learned about in the process of working on the podcast (not in the show):

Future Imperfect

San Diego

In California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, San Diego County is its own region. In the south it borders Mexico. Its western edge is 70 miles of Pacific coast, lined with beaches and cliffs. To the east is mountainous desert. This part of the state is home to about 3.4 million people – projected to grow to 4 million by 2050 and most of them live in the western part of the county. You’ll hear from three young people in the region whose experiences will help you glimpse San Diego's climate future. It includes sea-level rise, plus a whole lot more.

Questions

  1. In what ways is climate change expected to affect the San Diego region? Which of these effects will have the greatest impact on people’s day-to-day lives, in your opinion?

  2. What kinds of things affect sea level along the coast at any particular place and time? Explore the map at Our Coast Our Future to see how different combinations of sea level rise, wave height, flooding, and coastal erosion will affect the San Diego coast.

  3. How are historical and social factors making people’s experience of climate change better or worse? Think about sea level rise, heat, access to water, and flooding. Using the CalEnviroScreen, see which parts of San Diego county are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

  4. I asked the young people I interviewed to tell me about the future they worried about and the future they hoped for. How would you answer those questions?

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Amber (San Diego), Leilani (Bonita), and Diego (Chula Vista). I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

About anticipated climate change impacts:

From and about Indigenous peoples whose ancestral lands are in this region:

Sea level rise:

Wildland-Urban interface:

About the drying of the Colorado River:

Future Imperfect

Los Angeles

In California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, the Los Angeles region includes Los Angeles, Riverside, and Orange Counties, plus parts of Riverside and San Bernardino counties. 18 million people live here – almost half the population of California. How will climate change affect this part of the state? You'll hear from five young people in the region. Their experiences will help you understand Los Angeles' climate future.

Questions

  1. In what ways is climate change expected to affect the Los Angeles region? Which of these effects will have the greatest impact on people’s day-to-day lives, in your opinion?

  2. Why will some people in this region experience climate change more intensely than others? Using the CalEnviroScreen, see how vulnerable your own neighborhood is.

  3. How long have Native American communities lived in this region and how did their ancestors respond to natural shifts in California’s precipitation?

  4. In terms of your own feelings about climate change, do you identify with one of the young people interviewed for this episode? Why? Or, if you don’t identify with any of them, why not?

Voices

In order of appearance, the young people I interviewed for this episode were: Niaz (Newport Beach), Faith and Maddie (sisters from Fountain Valley), Monique (Riverside), and Nefertiti (Los Angeles). I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

More about anticipated climate change impacts:

Responses to urban heat effects:

About Indigenous peoples whose ancestral lands are in this region (partial list):

The water connection between Los Angeles and the Owens Valley:

Finally, you might have been wondering how Nefer knew so much about e-watse. She did a class project about it and made this PSA:

Future Imperfect

What is Climate Change?

What is climate change? What’s causing it? What will it mean for the world as a whole? And what does it mean to “fight” climate change? This first episode takes a look at the big picture. It also introduces our core three concepts: climate change mitigation, adaptation to climate change, and climate justice.

Questions

  1. How are greenhouse gas emissions contributing to global warming?

  2. What is the difference between global warming and climate change?

  3. What are four to five ways climate change will affect the world?

  4. What is the importance of +1.5 degrees Celsius?

  5. What is climate change mitigation? What is adaptation to climate change? What is climate justice?

Voices

Many of the young people I interviewed from various regions of the state show up in this episode. In order of first appearance, they are: Nef (Los Angeles), Michael (Huron), Monique (Riverside), Hriday (Livermore) , Elias (El Centro), Kaitlin (Ukiah) , Tehlias (Ukiah), Diego (Chula Vista) , Domingo (Watsonville), Frank (Watsonville), Mikayla (Windsor), Nadine (San Rafael), Isha (Oakland), Zeke (Canyon Arroyo), Brooke (Big Pine), Ivan (San Joaquin), Elizabeth (Delano), Karissa (Delano), Jayson (Sacramento), and Amber (San Diego).

I also spoke with my scientist-collaborator, Nancy Freitas.

Listening

Want to listen on another platform? You can find Future Imperfect on Apple Podcasts and on Stitcher.

Resources

If you want to dig deeper into some of the topics in this episode, here are some places to begin.

If you’re really diving deep, check out these sources:

Future Imperfect

Welcome to Future Imperfect!

This podcast is dedicated to exploring how climate change will affect individuals and communities across California. You’ll learn about the predictions in California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment and you’ll hear how those predicted changes could play out in your day-to-day future and what you can do to work toward a good climate future, rather than a catastrophe. All the episodes are tied together by three important concepts: climate change mitigation, adaptation to climate change, and climate justice.

Episodes feature the voices of young people, activists, and people working in state, local, and tribal governments. Nancy Freitas, a climate scientist studying at UC Berkeley, brings a scientific lens to each episode. She helps break down the scientific concepts we discuss. And finally, there’s me, the host, guiding you through this exploration of the future. I’m a former high school social studies teacher, so my focus is on how these physical changes will affect our human communities.

California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment breaks down California into nine geographic regions. Over the next few months, I’ll be releasing episodes about each of these regions. There will also be episodes to help you take action, focused on individual actions, activism, and involvement with local government. Finally, there will be episodes about big topics that tie the state together across regions: water, fire, and agriculture.

Each episode will also come with links to lots of follow-up resources and (for teachers) a few focus questions.

Finally, a huge thank you all the people who generously shared their personal and professional stories and knowledge during the tumultuous year of 2020. I’m extremely grateful to you.